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Site strip

#1

Could you explain why overlapping site strip depths are accumulated instead of using the approach taken for offsets which prioritise elements lower in the list over those above?

Thank you.
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#2

(09-05-2018, 01:49 PM)Marcus Wrote: Could you explain why overlapping site strip depths are accumulated instead of using the approach taken for offsets which prioritise elements lower in the list over those above?

Thank you.

Hi Marcus,

The logic of the program is that each element is built one after another, rather than subsequent elements being prioritised over earlier ones.

So if you do one platform on top of another the software will build the first platform, then the second.  Since the second may cut into (or fill over) the first it may appear that the second is being 'prioritised' over the first, but that's not really the logic of the program.

In the case of strips, the software creates the first strip, then the second, which will result is the levels being stripped twice.  The difference is that strips are defined by depths below the previous ground levels so the effect is cumulative.  On the other hand platforms are defined by absolute levels, so the platform underneath doesn't affect the levels for the platform above.

Does this make sense?  We have identified that this logic can be difficult, but on the other hand in some situations the ability to build up elements like this is a powerful feature of the program.  We're currently trying to think of ways that we can simplify this logic without compromising the versatility of the program.

Leo
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#3

Thank you, I think I understand.

I often place one platform inside another. For example I could draw out a path and place a house inside it. The path is calculated and then the house (which will have a deeper offset). This saves me having to manually omit the shape of the house from the path (this is what I thought of as "prioritising") and results in the path simply encompassing the building as desired.

I watched your Youtube video on Adjusting Subgrades to Formation and had never considered using site strip in the way you have explained. I am keen to try it. Once you get your head around what is happening I think the software can be a powerful tool.
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#4

(09-05-2018, 07:30 PM)Marcus Wrote: Thank you, I think I understand.

I often place one platform inside another. For example I could draw out a path and place a house inside it. The path is calculated and then the house (which will have a deeper offset). This saves me having to manually omit the shape of the house from the path (this is what I thought of as "prioritising") and results in the path simply encompassing the building as desired.

I watched your Youtube video on Adjusting Subgrades to Formation and had never considered using site strip in the way you have explained. I am keen to try it. Once you get your head around what is happening I think the software can be a powerful tool.


Yes if you haven't already it is worth watching "Understanding Construction Phases & Calculation Order". 

Effectively the Strip element could be called "Reduce Level" and the Spread element "Raise Level" the offsets work slightly differently as they only apply to the element in question.  The strip\spread can be used across multiple elements\ground.
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#5
(This post was last modified: 05-10-2021, 07:43 PM by sbible.)

Oh man, that is how it works... that is actually a really simple algorithm. I actually thought that there is a way tougher calculation that stands at the base of this software. I am actually working on my own website right now, and I really found this site strip useful, I might be using it for my site as well. However, before working on any other software, I have got to finish the SKAG Campaigns, as they are probably one of the most important features that I need right now, and I have to finish them in less than a week.
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#6

(05-09-2021, 05:35 PM)sbible Wrote: Oh man, that is how it works... that is actually a really simple algorithm.


In Kubla Cubed 2021 (due at the end of June 2021), this setup will be improved.  The strip will have a setting called : 

Depths From 
 

Which will have three options 'Ground', 'PreviousElement' and 'Specified Element'.  The default will be ground so strips will in fact overwrite each other like the absolute elements which is more useful in a lot of scenarios. 'Previous Element' (the behaviour in Kubla Cubed 2015, 2016, 2017, 2019) is there for backward compatibility reasons and some custom scenarios that it may be useful for.

'Specified Element' will be the new recommended method for doing the 'strip method' subgrade adjustment.  First you will do your FFL levels and then set the 'Depths From' to be from that element so it will allow the strips to replace each other where they intersect and act and still act on the lower down element.  A big improvement I think  in both workflows.

The Strip element will be renamed to Reduce as it makes more sense considering it is used for a lot of scenarios that are not topsoil stripping. The subgrade adjustment 'Strip Method' will be now called 'Reduce Method'.
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